2-Home Retreat at Historic Nick's Cove

2-Home Retreat at Historic Nick's Cove
23065 and 23075 State Route 1 Marshall, California 94940 United States

$2,995,000
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From the moment you arrive you get the feeling you are somewhere special… The love of a waterfront lifestyle was paramount in creating this Tomales Bay nautical themed 2-home retreat known as Angel Rock. The centerpiece of the main home is it’s...
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Golden Gate Sotheby's International Realty

Rick Trono
CalBRE# 01045523
Phone: +1 415.515.1117
Phone: +1 415.380.4322
78 E. Blithedale Avenue
Mill Valley, California 94941 United States
Jeff Brown
CalBRE# 01870772
Phone: +1 415.637.3172
Phone: +1 415.380.4300
78 E. Blithedale Avenue
Mill Valley, California 94941 United States
$2,995,000
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Price / Sq. Ft.:
$1,908 /
3
Bedrooms
2
Full Baths
1,570 Sq Ft.
Interior
2 Acres
Exterior
Single Family Home
8LY2TS
Web Id
21720891
MLS ID

About 23065 and 23075 State Route 1

From the moment you arrive you get the feeling you are somewhere special…

The love of a waterfront lifestyle was paramount in creating this Tomales Bay nautical themed 2-home retreat known as Angel Rock. The centerpiece of the main home is it’s crescent-shaped wooden bar, with colorful glass mosaic counter, a place for friends and family to enjoy a meal. A wonderful soaking tub tucked into a bay window looks out to the private yard. Sliders open to a wrap around tiered deck, the perfect spot to host a barbecue on a warm summer night or to enjoy your morning coffee. Watch river otters playing in the water, fish from the deck at high tide or go clamming at low tide, launch your boat from your private dock or kayak out to Hog Island. Paint the beautiful Point Reyes sunsets from the separate art studio located next to the Audubon Preserve.

Location

One of the most scenic drives in West Marin is along east shore of Tomales Bay to the little village at Nick’s Cove. In the fall you may witness the migration one of the many species of birds heading south for the winter. Fishing boats, sailboats are a common site on the pristine waters of the bay and so are the magnificent sunsets.

“Nick’s is a very special place that honors and respects the area, giving visitors a glimmer of an agrarian life that’s so near but really so far from the city consciousness. It seems impossible to believe it’s still in the 415 area code.”

–Michael Bauer, SF Chronicle


History of Nick’s Cove

Nick’s Cove is one of the last remaining historic settlements catering to the early California tourist trade on the beautiful Tomales Bay coastland. It’s served as a depot for tourism, local fishermen and agricultural operations throughout its history.

The property was originally part of a vast ranch until Henry W. Hallock, President Lincoln’s chief of staff during the Civil War, bought the property in 1850 and then sold it to Jeremiah Blake, an easterner who settled on Tomales Bay at a place that became known as Blake’s Landing. During that time, the property was the site of industries as diverse as saddle making, duck raising and dairy farming. The North Pacific Coast Railroad constructed tracks along the shorefront in 1873, spanning the region from Sausalito to the Russian River, transporting passengers and freight, such as dairy products, fish and clams.

But it was the construction of a modern highway in 1930, followed by the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1937, that brought a surge in tourist traffic looking for food, lodging and adventure. Marin County became a popular destination for weekend motorists, and Tomales Bay was an especially popular choice because of its excellent fishing.

In 1973, the widow Dorothy Matkovich sold Nick’s Cove to Alfred and Ruth Gibson, ending more than 40 years of family ownership. The Gibson’s ran the business on very similar lines, and continued to attract hunters, fishermen, nature lovers and unsuspecting travelers who stumbled upon a restaurant/motel full of character and scenic beauty. Guests included university professors, writers, sportsmen, kayakers, and a private pilot who rented one of the cabins every time he flew into the Bay Area. Under the Gibsons, the popularity of Nick’s Cove continued to grow, and further improvements were made to the property. After Al Gibson’s death, Ruth Gibson continued to operate the restaurant and rental business until maintaining the property proved too costly.

The current owners of Nick’s Cove have taken special care to maintain the integrity of its traditional architecture in recognition of the cottages’ historical importance. These cabins reflects the coastal vernacular style common to the community, and they have been carefully preserved, while improving their decor to accommodate modern amenities, without damaging their historical qualities.

-- Courtesy of Nicks Cove


Amenities

  •  2 Fireplaces
  •  Deck
  •  Fenced Yard
  •  Patio
  •  Dock
  •  Hardwood Flooring
  •  Artist Studio